handtosondheim:

scriblonza:

i-cant-i-have-rehearsal:

elderpooptarts:

divawithanunspoiledagenda:

nerdnuggets:

jelliclephantomfaces:

chandraleeschwartz:

six-months-from-never:

*sees broom*

*picks up broom*

“TELL THEM HOW I AM DEFYYYYYYYYYING GRAAAAAVITTYYYY”

*starts sweeping broom sadly*

“There is a castle on a cloud…”

*holds broom horizontally*

“Never need a reason, never need a rhyme. Up on the roof top step in time!”

*sweeps broom angrily*

“IT’S A HARD KNOCK LIFE!”

*begins waltzing with broom* I could have DAAAAANCED all NIIIIIGHT

*hits broom handle on the ground and tap dances* LOOK AT ME! IM THE KING OF NEW YORK!

*gently places broom against a wall* I’m the belle of the ball in my own little corner!

*broom starts dancing of its own accord*
BE.
OUR.
GUEST!

so apparently musicals have a thing for brooms huh

Okay, I didn’t want to say anything because I’m positive I’ll come off as a know-it-all, but I honestly can’t help myself.

What’s the consistent thing we see in musicals? A transition from the dull and mundane into the strange and magical.

They’re fast-paced with elements of the weird.

What better way to communicate that this isn’t your ordinary story than to transform the ordinary into the extraordinary?

These characters dream of something better than what they have, right?

As they do their boring daily routines, they daydream about the life that they dream of having. And that’s when they start singing about the things that are important to them.

Everyone stopping what they’re doing in order to sing is obviously not representative of what happens in real life, so why not show the viewer the actual transition from dullness into strangeness?

Plus, they’re sweeping you up into their world. Hahahahahaha.

I mean, I could be completely wrong, but that’s how I see it, and I think it’s right.

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