Car Trips


(There’s this thing called stealing? Really? I don’t believe I’ve heard of it. Have you? Oh, good, because stealing sounds like a really bad thing, and I can’t imagine any of you doing something like that.)

Road trip!

What do you do in the car on long trips?

Do you talk? Play games? Listen to music?

Write?

That’s right. Do you write when you go on a car ride?

If so, good! If not, why not?

What’s stopping you? If you have motion sickness, you’re mostly exempt. I still find a way to write when I’m in the car, even though my motion sickness medicine makes me very, very sleepy.

A car ride is one of the best places to write, especially if it’s a long one. Why? Because you’re trapped. Sad, but true.

You probably don’t have Internet. You can stare out the window for a while, but you’re more than likely going to want something to do for a while. Talking eventually stops. You can listen to music and write without issue. Car trip games don’t last forever (usually).

You have beautiful scenery and good friends/family with you. What’s more inspiring than that? Travel is a romantic idea and theme you can use. Almost all stories boil down to two things: 1. Someone new comes to town. 2. Someone goes on a journey (whether metaphorical or physical).

Well, you’re doing at least one of those while you’re traveling! Let it inspire you.

Your assignment: Write from the perspective of someone who has no interest in traveling. This person needs to be at least a little more open to it by the end of your work. Try to do this while in a vehicle if you’re not driving!

Car Trips


(There’s this thing called stealing? Really? I don’t believe I’ve heard of it. Have you? Oh, good, because stealing sounds like a really bad thing, and I can’t imagine any of you doing something like that.)

Road trip!

What do you do in the car on long trips?

Do you talk? Play games? Listen to music?

Write?

That’s right. Do you write when you go on a car ride?

If so, good! If not, why not?

What’s stopping you? If you have motion sickness, you’re mostly exempt. I still find a way to write when I’m in the car, even though my motion sickness medicine makes me very, very sleepy.

A car ride is one of the best places to write, especially if it’s a long one. Why? Because you’re trapped. Sad, but true.

You probably don’t have Internet. You can stare out the window for a while, but you’re more than likely going to want something to do for a while. Talking eventually stops. You can listen to music and write without issue. Car trip games don’t last forever (usually).

You have beautiful scenery and good friends/family with you. What’s more inspiring than that? Travel is a romantic idea and theme you can use. Almost all stories boil down to two things: 1. Someone new comes to town. 2. Someone goes on a journey (whether metaphorical or physical).

Well, you’re doing at least one of those while you’re traveling! Let it inspire you.

Your assignment: Write from the perspective of someone who has no interest in traveling. This person needs to be at least a little more open to it by the end of your work. Try to do this while in a vehicle if you’re not driving!

Friends


(This is my picture. Not yours. And that stealing thing I mentioned before? We still understand each other that, right? Cool.)

So friends are actually pretty cool to have. Just saying.

If you know that one of your friends is moving away, then spend time with that person

Seriously. It should be a no-brainer.

You can sit at home and write and wonder if your friend is feeling lonely or like no one will miss him/her. Or you can make him/her feel loved and know that (s)he will be missed.

Love everyone you can.

Because you never know when you’ll regret not giving people your time.

Writing is important. But it can wait.

Life is out there. And it’s beckoning you.

Your assignment: Go spend time with a friend. If you both like to write, then write together. If not, then write about your favorite memories of friendship. Feel free to include memories that bring you pain. Life has its ups and downs. Don’t discredit any of them.

Friends


(This is my picture. Not yours. And that stealing thing I mentioned before? We still understand each other that, right? Cool.)

So friends are actually pretty cool to have. Just saying.

If you know that one of your friends is moving away, then spend time with that person

Seriously. It should be a no-brainer.

You can sit at home and write and wonder if your friend is feeling lonely or like no one will miss him/her. Or you can make him/her feel loved and know that (s)he will be missed.

Love everyone you can.

Because you never know when you’ll regret not giving people your time.

Writing is important. But it can wait.

Life is out there. And it’s beckoning you.

Your assignment: Go spend time with a friend. If you both like to write, then write together. If not, then write about your favorite memories of friendship. Feel free to include memories that bring you pain. Life has its ups and downs. Don’t discredit any of them.

Character Death


(I really like this photo. I will cry if you steal it. ‘Nuff said.)

Let’s get uncomfortable.

You love your characters. They’re your babies. Even if they’re vile and you’d never want to meet them in real life, you love them anyway. Because they’re your creations.

Only you can decide what happens to them. Sometimes, there’s the temptation to coddle them and give them everything they could ever want.

If they were real, they probably wouldn’t want to have everything handed to them on a silver platter. But guess what? They’re characters. They can’t tell you what they want.

And it’s your job not to care. Your job is to get the story told. If that requires a massive slaughter of everyone, then so be it. It has to happen. You can’t pout and say, “But I don’t want Character A to kill Character B. They’re in love.” Tough crap if they’re in love. If Character A needs to be a certain person for your story to be told correctly, then you need to do whatever it takes to make him or her that person. Sometimes, that involves having them do things you don’t want them to.

Yes, they’re your characters, and you control what they do. But you have to remain true to characterization and plot.

You have to suck it up and kill them sometimes.

It happens. Get over it.

Push your characters to their limits–see what they’re made of. Show yourself what they can do. Don’t stop until you get exactly what you need.

That may take tons of rewrites. They’re worth it if you want to do your characters justice.

Personally, I kill someone off in just about every short story I write. It’s almost a compulsion. It’s something that has to happen. I don’t know why. But it’s better than me killing real people, isn’t it?

Your assignment: Write a short story (3-20 pages) in which a character dies. Sounds simple, right? Make it unpredictable. Write a character so deep into chaos that (s)he does not know what he or she will do from moment to moment. (You don’t have to do that last one, but it will be rewarding if you do. Just don’t delve into insanity the way your character has.) I know you don’t like killing your creations, but it has to happen sometime.

Character Death


(I really like this photo. I will cry if you steal it. ‘Nuff said.)

Let’s get uncomfortable.

You love your characters. They’re your babies. Even if they’re vile and you’d never want to meet them in real life, you love them anyway. Because they’re your creations.

Only you can decide what happens to them. Sometimes, there’s the temptation to coddle them and give them everything they could ever want.

If they were real, they probably wouldn’t want to have everything handed to them on a silver platter. But guess what? They’re characters. They can’t tell you what they want.

And it’s your job not to care. Your job is to get the story told. If that requires a massive slaughter of everyone, then so be it. It has to happen. You can’t pout and say, “But I don’t want Character A to kill Character B. They’re in love.” Tough crap if they’re in love. If Character A needs to be a certain person for your story to be told correctly, then you need to do whatever it takes to make him or her that person. Sometimes, that involves having them do things you don’t want them to.

Yes, they’re your characters, and you control what they do. But you have to remain true to characterization and plot.

You have to suck it up and kill them sometimes.

It happens. Get over it.

Push your characters to their limits–see what they’re made of. Show yourself what they can do. Don’t stop until you get exactly what you need.

That may take tons of rewrites. They’re worth it if you want to do your characters justice.

Personally, I kill someone off in just about every short story I write. It’s almost a compulsion. It’s something that has to happen. I don’t know why. But it’s better than me killing real people, isn’t it?

Your assignment: Write a short story (3-20 pages) in which a character dies. Sounds simple, right? Make it unpredictable. Write a character so deep into chaos that (s)he does not know what he or she will do from moment to moment. (You don’t have to do that last one, but it will be rewarding if you do. Just don’t delve into insanity the way your character has.) I know you don’t like killing your creations, but it has to happen sometime.

I don’t like reblogging, but this is worth it. Every girl deserves to know she is beautiful. 🙂

i-ate-your-soul:

miguelofthedark:

wegoupinsmoke:

beach-boyyy:

A tan girl in a bikini can get thousands of notes… My sister Allison was born with Downsyndrome and she cant help it! so i showed her this site and shes like i want this picture got get more notes than any picture out there… so can you guys make this possible for her??? Please guys thank you soo much! ❤

sweetest brother ever.

awww ❤ This should get 1,000,00+ notes ❤

She’s way more beautiful than any half naked girl on the internet.

I don’t like reblogging, but this is worth it. Every girl deserves to know she is beautiful. 🙂

i-ate-your-soul:

miguelofthedark:

wegoupinsmoke:

beach-boyyy:

A tan girl in a bikini can get thousands of notes… My sister Allison was born with Downsyndrome and she cant help it! so i showed her this site and shes like i want this picture got get more notes than any picture out there… so can you guys make this possible for her??? Please guys thank you soo much! ❤

sweetest brother ever.

awww ❤ This should get 1,000,00+ notes ❤

She’s way more beautiful than any half naked girl on the internet.

Rejection


(This is a snake. He will find you and visit you if you steal his picture.)

Rejection sucks.

Say it out loud.

Feel better?

Didn’t think so.

The thing about rejection is that it happens.

Seriously. That’s just how the world works. You can write the best thing ever, but if you send it to the wrong place, they will reject it. Whether it’s because it’s unsolicited or because it doesn’t fit the themes they like, it will be rejected. Fact of life.

If a magazine says they like horror stories, and you send them a gooey romance, then they will reject it. It doesn’t matter if it’s the greatest love story of all time. It will be rejected. Get your crap in order and send it to someone who wants it.

A lot of rejection comes from stuff like that. If they have had too many stories like yours–even if yours is the best–then it will be turned down. Same goes if they already have enough for the next edition. It’s just bad luck sometimes.

But sometimes it’s because you haven’t spent enough time editing or because they had something different in mind.

However, rejection letters don’t normally tell you what’s wrong with your work. It’s a sheet or slip that they send to everyone rejected. It doesn’t matter if your work is a million times better than the next person they rejected–you get the same letter.

It sucks even thinking about it.

Rejection sucks in general. Whether you’re being broken up with or finding out that you’re not invited to something or not making it into your school’s writing magazine, rejection sucks. Rejection is awful in every form.

But it usually comes for a reason. Maybe it’s to make you make your work better. It’s up to you to figure out the reason.

And it’s up to you to figure out how to respond to it. You can take it badly and give up. Or you can work harder and figure out what you need to do to improve.

I heard a story of a writer who used her rejection letters for wallpaper. When she’d get another one, she’d say, “Oh, good, I was hoping to fill in that gap over there.”

That’s one of the best attitudes toward rejection I’ve ever heard of. Do you want people to tell stories of how well you handle things? Or how badly?

It’s up to you to decide how you’ll react to rejection. Because rejection is inevitable.

Your assignment: Find a rejection letter you’ve received. Read it. If you remember what was rejected, look at it and figure out what needs to be fixed. If you don’t have a letter or haven’t had the opportunity to be rejected, then go find something you think would be rejected by a professional. Edit it. Just because rejection is inevitable doesn’t mean you can’t try to prevent it. Don’t go overboard. Above all, make yourself happy.

Rejection


(This is a snake. He will find you and visit you if you steal his picture.)

Rejection sucks.

Say it out loud.

Feel better?

Didn’t think so.

The thing about rejection is that it happens.

Seriously. That’s just how the world works. You can write the best thing ever, but if you send it to the wrong place, they will reject it. Whether it’s because it’s unsolicited or because it doesn’t fit the themes they like, it will be rejected. Fact of life.

If a magazine says they like horror stories, and you send them a gooey romance, then they will reject it. It doesn’t matter if it’s the greatest love story of all time. It will be rejected. Get your crap in order and send it to someone who wants it.

A lot of rejection comes from stuff like that. If they have had too many stories like yours–even if yours is the best–then it will be turned down. Same goes if they already have enough for the next edition. It’s just bad luck sometimes.

But sometimes it’s because you haven’t spent enough time editing or because they had something different in mind.

However, rejection letters don’t normally tell you what’s wrong with your work. It’s a sheet or slip that they send to everyone rejected. It doesn’t matter if your work is a million times better than the next person they rejected–you get the same letter.

It sucks even thinking about it.

Rejection sucks in general. Whether you’re being broken up with or finding out that you’re not invited to something or not making it into your school’s writing magazine, rejection sucks. Rejection is awful in every form.

But it usually comes for a reason. Maybe it’s to make you make your work better. It’s up to you to figure out the reason.

And it’s up to you to figure out how to respond to it. You can take it badly and give up. Or you can work harder and figure out what you need to do to improve.

I heard a story of a writer who used her rejection letters for wallpaper. When she’d get another one, she’d say, “Oh, good, I was hoping to fill in that gap over there.”

That’s one of the best attitudes toward rejection I’ve ever heard of. Do you want people to tell stories of how well you handle things? Or how badly?

It’s up to you to decide how you’ll react to rejection. Because rejection is inevitable.

Your assignment: Find a rejection letter you’ve received. Read it. If you remember what was rejected, look at it and figure out what needs to be fixed. If you don’t have a letter or haven’t had the opportunity to be rejected, then go find something you think would be rejected by a professional. Edit it. Just because rejection is inevitable doesn’t mean you can’t try to prevent it. Don’t go overboard. Above all, make yourself happy.

%d bloggers like this: